Friday, May 3, 2024

Papinville History

 STORIES ALONG YOUR 5K WALK AND RUN AT PAPINVILLE

This week you will be reading historical short stories about Papinville as you go on the 5K WALK AND RUN. This event will be Sat. June 8 starting at 8:30 am at the Papinville School and museum. Those of you that pre-registered will pick up your shirts at this time. Those of you that have not pre-registered and want a shirt have until May 20th to send in your registration. Go on line under Papinville History on face book and print a copy of registration with $20.00 if you order a shirt and send to the address on the registration. If you have any questions call 417 395 2594 or 816 590 1029.

We are also having a Corn Hole Tournament at 10:30am. Two people to a team at $25.00 a team. The winning team of the tournament will receive a nice prize. Keep following the stories to find out what the prize is going to be. If you have questions call the numbers above. More events will be published next week.

The first story will be about the courthouse to the east of the school. It set on the left side of Market Street. (this the street that is in front of the museum). Papinville was named after Melicourt Papin. He came to Papinville to work for the American Fur Company that was located on the Marais des Cygne River at Papinville. He purchased 70  acres in 1847. At this time Vernon County was part of Bates County and Papinville was the central location for the courthouse. Papin gave the 70 acres to start building the town. There were many people that came here to get the town started. Many houses and businesses at this time were built. They built a hewn-log structure, on the north side of Market street, but in 1853 a two story building was built out of bricks at the cost of $4,200.00 . It is said that the bricks were made from the clay here in Papinville. By the act of the State Legislature, Feb. 27, 1855 Vernon County was organized and the courthouse for Vernon County was located in Nevada. In 1856 the court house was moved to Butler. It was more in the center of the county. The courthouse was sold to Philip Zeal who occupied it as a store until 1861. It was destroyed by fire from Jim Lane’s troops. Most of Papinville was destroyed and the bridge was burnt to prevent General Price from entering the county with his troops. This happened two years before Order 11. You will go by Court Street and the courthouse was located to the west side of court street.

         The next streets are Prairie and Market Street corner. You will go to your left on Prairie. To your right of Prairie Street  is the addition that Andrew Jackson gave to the town in 1868. They were running out of room to build more houses and two churches were built in this area. People were moving back to find their homesteads that were burnt in Order 11. Many just found the chimney as to where their house stood. The Civil war ended on April 9, 1865 with the confederates surrendering.  It was about 1866 when the people started moving back to Papinville. The town was booming , because people were moving west to a new frontier.

        

         Next week you will read about Main Street and the river bridge. This walk and run will be a historical walk and run for all to enjoy. Let’s hope the high water will go away so we can enjoy the out of doors and enjoy the birds singing to us as we do the historical walk and run. Next week we should know about more events for the day. We will be serving lunch starting at 11:30am. If you have not registered for the walk and run and want a shirt you need to do that by May 20th so we can get the shirts ordered. This is a benefit to help us build a new museum and what is now the museum will be turned into a hall so we can have programs and people can rent the hall for family get togethers. Hope you will enjoy the stories and come out to Papinville and see our museum, school, history walk way and the wooden metal bridge that is 140 years old this year. Until next week with the rest of the stories.

                             Submitted by

                                             Phyllis Stewart




Cheryl "Sherry" Renee Boyles, 59, Archie

  Funeral services for Sherry Boyles of Archie, Missouri will be 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 17, 2024 at Schowengerdt Funeral Chapel (660-679-655...